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Co Youth Pastors April and Greg Pruett Speak

Co Youth Pastors April and Greg Pruett Speak

Rev. Crystal April 11, 2016 0 comments
11Apr
0
Co Youth Pastors April and Greg Pruett Speak
 
I am blessed to say that I got the opportunity to go to Bible College and Seminary with many young women who felt the call to lead in ministry. Several of them wanted to youth pastor, and were very excited when they heard that a church was looking for one. But there was one thing standing in their way. They only wanted a married couple or single man to lead the youth. Within a few years, the situation has changed. There are more young women stepping into the role as Youth or Student Pastor. I have worked closely with youth groups in both situations, single and married. There are a few lessons I have learned that work across both lines.
 
1. Believe: God called you to do something great. Don’t let someone make you question your calling. Many women have to work harder to earn respect in leadership, but don’t make yourself work hard for your own approval. God called and equipped you for the task, let Him work out the details. One passage that always encourages me is Luke 4:18-19. Stay in God’s Word and share these moments of doubts with God in prayer.
 
2. Make a Contract: One of the biggest issues in ministry is when a leader does not know their job description. If you and your pastor are both clear on what to expect at the beginning, then there are less chances of problems in the future.
 
3. You Are Not The Parent: Let parents do their job! There are some lines you just can’t cross. Don’t put yourself in an awkward situation. You have enough responsibilities, so don’t add parenting a whole youth group on the list.
 
4. Seek Counsel: You have a great pastor who believes in you, so include them. Not only will they have helpful advice when it comes to dealing with youth and parent problems, they can be your biggest supporter.
 
5.  Develop a Team: You can’t do everything. Scout your church and find those who are a Christ-like example, and who you share a mutual respect with. Run these names by your pastor and get his/her advice. Once you have the green light, form your team! A solid youth ministry is going to at least have Sunday school class, bible study, services, activities, fundraisers, and every social media account out there. You can’t do everything. Learn to trust others and let them help you.
6. Take a Sabbath: Don’t worry, we do not live under the Law. But before the Law was formed, God did something awesome on the 7th day. God rested. Taking a break is a necessity. Know your limits and don’t commit to more than you can do. Allow yourself days where you don’t go to a youth event, teach a lesson, or read another book about youth ministry. If you don’t give yourself a break you will burn yourself out. And when this happens you don’t do your job as good as you could. 
Copyright 2013 April Pruett and Crystal Schmalz Ministries
In Category : Uncategorized
About The Author Rev. Crystal Rev. Crystal Schmalz is a licensed minister in the United Pentecostal Church International, holds a Master of Divinity degree from Urshan Graduate School of Theology, and a Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Humanities and History from Michigan State University. Crystal has served as a staff chaplain at Barnes Jewish Hospital, has completed five units of Clinical Pastoral Education, and is a member of ACPE. She served as a ministry staff leader for ACMNP in Yellowstone National Park and enjoys the beauty of God’s creation. She served on staff at Life Christian Church pastored by David Stephens doing outreach, guest coordination, youth leadership, Sunday school, and music ministry. She currently attends New Life Center pastored by Garry Tracy, and is involved in teaching Sunday school, preaching at nursing homes, teaching Bible Studies, and helping people connect to God and community. Crystal loves to spend time with her husband Luke, and her hobbies include writing, “thrifting,” eating ice cream, and playing Settlers of Catan and Scrabble with friends and family.

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